Cosmic Clock Video By Hanson


Read here about a video that is an important tool for comprehending macro-scales.

Overview

Cosmic Clock is a 3:35 minute photo-realistic animation that makes overt the time dilation involved in macro-scale visualizations. See Cosmic Clock Video by Hanson.

Its Aim: Observing the Universe using the finite speed of light to place measured objects in their correct temporal context.



Text from the website:
This 3:35 minute animation contains a visualization of the entire Universe from three different points of view: the time spectrum of observable photon radiation arriving at the earth, the constant-time shells of light sources represented in "co-moving coordinates " (as though the Universe had always been the size it is today), and in "physical coordinates" (which incorporate the Hubble expansion since the "Great Flash", when the Universe was about 300,000 years old). This film was one of a select few chosen for showing at the Siggraph 2000 Electronic Theater in July 2000, and appears in Siggraph Video Review 134, Scene 5 (2000).

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Aim: Observing the Universe using the finite speed of light to place measured objects in their correct temporal context.

This 3:35 minute animation contains a visualization of the entire Universe from three different points of view: the time spectrum of observable photon radiation arriving at the earth, the constant-time shells of light sources represented in "co-moving coordinates " (as though the Universe had always been the size it is today), and in "physical coordinates" (which incorporate the Hubble expansion since the "Great Flash", when the Universe was about 300,000 years old). This film was one of a select few chosen for showing at the Siggraph 2000 Electronic Theater in July 2000, and appears in Siggraph Video Review 134, Scene 5 (2000).

The Cosmic Bloom excerpt from the movie is available on YouTube.

Andrew J. Hanson is professor of computer science at the School of Informatics and Computing at the University of Indiana.

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