Motion


Read here about a physical property that can be measured and depicted in a scalometer.

Units of motion

Units of motion describe relative change in displacement of an event in relation to other events.

Velocity

In physics, velocity is the measurement of the rate and direction of change in the position of an object. It is a vector physical quantity; both magnitude and direction are required to define it. The scalar absolute value (magnitude) of velocity is speed, a quantity that is measured in metres per second (m/s) when using the SI (metric) system.

Velocity can take a positive or negative value, the sign indicating direction of the velocity vector.

There is a maximum velocity, being the maximum speed at which all energy, matter, and information in the universe can travel, otherwise known as the speed of light.

There is a theoretical minimum velocity, being the state of no change in relation to another event. In reality, such a state can only be achieved for an exceedingly short period of time.

Acceleration

In physics, velocity is the measurement of the rate and direction of change in the position of an object. It is a vector physical quantity; both magnitude and direction are required to define it. The scalar absolute value (magnitude) of velocity is speed, a quantity that is measured in metres per second (m/s or ms−1) when using the SI (metric) system.

Acceleration can take a positive or negative value, the sign indicating direction of the velocity vector.

The maximum acceleration is that acceleration that will change the speed of an object to be the maximum speed of propagation.

There is a theoretical minimum acceleration, being the state of no change in speed in relation to another event. In reality, such a state can only be achieved for an exceedingly short period of time.

Jerk

In physics, jerk, also known as jolt, surge and lurch, is the rate of change of acceleration; that is, the derivative of acceleration with respect to time, the second derivative of velocity, or the third derivative of position. Jerk is a vector, and there is no generally used term to describe its scalar magnitude (e.g. "speed" as the scalar magnitude for velocity).
The units of jerk are metres per second cubed (metres per second per second per second, m/s3 or m·s−3). There is no universal agreement on the symbol for jerk, but j is commonly used. Note also the existence of yank—the derivative of force with respect to time, equivalent to the product of mass and jerk.

Jerk can take a positive or negative value, the sign indicating direction of the velocity vector.

The maximum jerk is that jerk that will change the speed of an object to be the maximum speed of propagation.

There is a theoretical minimum jerk, being the state of no change in speed in relation to another event. In reality, such a state can only be achieved for an exceedingly short period of time.